Abandoning Ship

December 1, 2006

The state of TIAH

Today In Alternate History

Digg this

Alternate Historian’s Note: NaNoWriMo is over, but we have more novel-writing to do. And, since Blogger still hasn’t restored our ability to update the old TIAH site, we plan to do it here. We also have Guest Historians who will be writing entries for your entertainment. As regards returning to the main site, please raise a fuss with Blogger and Google about this, if you have a blog or can post to one. I have yet to receive a reply from them about our situation, and it is starting to tick me off. Don’t change your bookmarks yet, but I have to say that WordPress is very nice compared to Blogger, so I am definitely thinking about making this move permanent. If you like it, too, email and let us know. In the meantime, be sure to visit our Guest Historian’s, too, when they have a web site they want you to visit. Stephen Payne’s work can be had from Lulu. Thanks for sticking with us!

in 1872, on board the Mary Celeste; Captain Albert Richardson is a risk-taker, but after his service in the slaughter known as the American Civil War, he takes no chances with his men. He orders the remaining five members of the crew into the lifeboat, which he secures to the ship with a strong tow-line. For good measure, he takes the ship’s navigation tools and a supply of rations. He goes below deck to open barrel #1701. Minutes later he returns shrieking, “Cut the rope, cut the rope!” And they are adrift in the Atlantic. Richardson sits speechlessly on the lifeboat as they distance themselves from the Celeste. By the time he is completely dry, the crew has noticed that 28-year old Captain Albert Richardson’s hair has gone completely white. –entry by Steve Payne from Counter History in Context – You’re the Judge!

in 1941, the British Eighth Army led by Field Marshall Bernard Law Montgomery crosses the western border of Egypt preparing to overrun French North Africa. The academic disciplines of physics and history compete as Karl Marx’ theory of irreversible historical processes is about to be sorely tested as an irresistible force is about to collide with an immovable object. In Algiers, the Desert Rat known as Brigadier General Charles André Joseph Marie de Gaulle readies La Grande Armée Afrique for a fight to the death. The destruction of the French Mediterranean Fleet at Mers-el-Kébir severely limits supply options for de Gaulle. As a former boxing champion in La Grande Armée he knows that a knock-out punch is required in the first round. Driven by the greater glory of France, he prepares French Forces to defeat the “axis of evil” criminals responsible for the “day of infamy deux six un un” (2611). –entry by Steve Payne from Counter History in Context – You’re the Judge!

in 1966, Bill Moyers regains consciousness in a locked underground room in the White House. His unidentified companion brings him up to speed – “‘Nam is one big meat-grinder for the project. Hybrids like Johnson are being developed by the Alliance for re-population; conversion failures are hidden amongst combat body count”. Incredulously, Moyers looks away and his eyes settle on a silent TV screen showing the United Nations Security Council in session. US Ambassador Arthur J. Goldberg is speaking to British Representative Lord Caradon, there is a bottle of Fresca in front of both of them. His mouth in an o-shape, Moyers turns back to his companion and says – “I think I understand”. –entry by Steve Payne from Counter History in Context – You’re the Judge!

in 1990, Israeli Flying Ace Ilan Ramon receives a mission briefing directly from Prime Minister Yitshak Shamir. Ramon was the leader of the 1981 attack which destroyed the Iraqi nuclear reactor at Osirak. Codenamed Operation Opera, eight F-16 multi-role fighters and six F-15 escorts had flown so close together as to appear as a single large jet on Iraqi radar. Shamir explains that the mission he has in mind is similar in tactical execution, but more decisive for the future of the State of Israel. –entry by Steve Payne from Counter History in Context – You’re the Judge!

Before(cont.)
Janice woke up and looked at her watch. It was just a few minutes until the alarm was going to go off, so she turned it off and looked over at the bed. Miss Raintree was sleeping like a baby, Janice stood and stretched, envying the young woman’s easy rest. Her neck was sore and her back and butt were complaining from sleeping propped up at the door.
She went to the bathroom and splashed some water on her face, used the facilities, then went back to the door. Miss Raintree stirred a little, but didn’t wake up. Janice still could use some evidence from her, or at least contact information, but doubted that anyone was still available at Raintree’s Crawford address. This was probably the best place to leave her.
She touched the young woman’s shoulder and shook her. Raintree woke up, disoriented. “Hey, kid, it’s OK. You’re in a motel about twenty miles from Waco. I need to leave you here for a few hours, maybe most of the day. I’ll pay for the room.” She looked into Raintree’s eyes and asked, “Will you stay here till I get back?”
The young woman pushed some hair out of her face and mumbled, “Sure.”
“It’s very important that you are still here when I get back. Do you understand me?”
“Yeah, yeah,” Raintree said, flopped her head back on the pillow.
“I’m leaving some money for you to get breakfast and lunch at the diner here. I should be back before dinner.” I hope, she didn’t add.
“Thanks.”
“You bail on me, and I’m going to hunt you down.” She tightened her grip on Raintree’s shoulder. “You got me?”
Raintree looked hurt and confused. “OK, OK. I’ll stay here.” When Janice let go of her shoulder, she said, “I got noplace else to go, anyway.”
Janice turned to the door, then thought of something and turned back. “If somebody other than me tries to get you to take off with them, don’t. You know some things that certain people don’t want to become public. OK?”
Raintree just mumbled. Janice let her go back to sleep. She left a couple of Andrew Jacksons on the table, picked up her things, and walked outside. It had gotten chilly overnight, and her breath fogged up as she stood there and got used to it. She looked over in the direction of her car, so no one around it, and then walked over to the motel’s front desk.
The same guy was still there, looking bleary-eyed and grumpy. “I need to pay for another day,” she told him.
“Fine,” he said. “$49.50.”
She pulled out some more of her dwindling supply of twenties and handed them over. He got her change and handed it back to her. “Any news on when you’ll be able to leave?”
“No.” He looked dejectedly over at the television behind the counter. “They say the emergency is ‘ongoing’. Crap. I was gonna graduate this semester, too.”
“Life’s hard all over,” Janice said, walking back to her car.

Cool stuff – Let us know where you are on Frappr! and We’ve been Dugg

We have links again! Yay, us. Check them out on the side of the main page, and if you have some suggestions, send them to us!

Visit the Co-Historian’s store –

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: